FAMU

$1.1M Available to Black-Owned Businesses in Florida. Come Out Thursday, August 23 to See If Your Business Qualifies

Community Outreach Flyer_FAMU Credit Union08232018

Thanks to a $1.1 million grant included in last year’s budget,   black-owned businesses across the state can now apply for a loan through a program administered by the Florida A&M University Federal Credit Union in partnership with the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity.

Locally, the Office of Economic Opportunity (OEO) and Florida A&M University Federal Credit Union will present LOANS AND LENDING FOR BLACK BUSINESS OWNERS, 6:30pm-8:00pm, Thursday, August 23, 2018, St. Paul AME Church, V.F. Mitchell Fellowship Hall, 1866 NW 51 Terrace, Miami, FL 33142. 

“The MDCPS Office of Economic Opportunity is excited to partner with the FAMU Federal Credit Union and provide meaningful information on loans and lending to local black businesses,” said Torey Alston, head of OEO for Miami-Dade County Public Schools.

Learn more about the application process and requirements to access these funds. The event is FREE to attend. You may RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/introducing-florida-am-university-credit-union-tickets-48927176502. Please share this information with your networks.

Https---cdn.evbuc.com-images-48447171-75443705897-1-original.jpg

 

Va-va signature with butterflies

@vanessawbyers

 


Nelson secures federal funding for Floridians

1200px-Bill_Nelson
U.S. Senator Bill Nelson

 

Washington, DC – U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson (D-FL) announced that the $1.3 trillion spending package Congress unveiled last night includes funding for several projects and programs important to Floridians including: increased spending  to fight the opioid epidemic, additional funding for citrus greening research and significant funding for democracy programs in both Venezuela and Cuba, as well as provisions Nelson co-sponsored to address gun violence. 

Funding for the following Florida projects and programs sought by Nelson have been included in the federal spending package: 

·         $3.3 billion to fight the opioid epidemic and mental health crises. An estimated 2.6 million Americans suffer from opioid use disorder. In Florida alone, more than 5,200 people have died from an opioid-related event in 2016 – a 35 percent increase from 2015. Nelson requested additional funding for treatment, prevention and research. 

·         $67.47 million in total funding for citrus greening research and the Citrus Health Research Program. As citrus greening has hurt growers across Florida, Nelson has advocated for increased funding to study and address the problem to help the state’s citrus industry. 

·         $895 million for Kennedy Space Center to modernize launch facilities, more than doubling what the center received last year.  Nelson requested the increased funding to bolster work on launch and processing infrastructure needed for NASA’s initiative to explore deep space. 

·         $121 million for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to purchase a reliable backup for its aging hurricane hunter jet.  Nelson has been pushing for a replacement since 2015. The funding comes in the wake of several incidents over the last two years when the jet NOAA uses to gather hurricane measurements was grounded during hurricane season. 

·         $76.5 million in total funding to protect and restore the Everglades. U.S. Army Corps budget was also increased, allowing additional funding for Everglades restoration. 

·         $82 million to repair the Herbert Hoover Dike. U.S. Army Corps budget was also increased, allowing for additional funding for dike repairs. 

·         $279.6 million, a 14-percent increase, in funding to support Historical Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). The four historically black colleges and universities in Florida—Florida A&M in Tallahassee, Florida Memorial University in Miami Gardens, Bethune-Cookman University in Daytona Beach and Edward Waters College in Jacksonville – prepare over 16,000 students for careers in STEM, aviation, law, nursing and other fields. 

·         $250 million in federal funding for positive train control grants.  Positive train control technology will help prevent deadly crashes on our railroads. It’s critically important for those railroads that carry passengers, like Sunrail and Tri-Rail.  Nelson, the ranking member on the Senate Commerce Committee, pressed for the funding to help passenger railroads meet a federal deadline to install the lifesaving technology.  

·         $100 million for research and development program for automated vehicles. The SunTrax facility at Florida Polytechnic University is a qualified proving ground and will have the opportunity to benefit from the program. 

·         Restored and increased funds to $35 million for democracy programs in Venezuela and Cuba. Nelson requested Congress “redouble, not eliminate support for democracy and human rights” in Venezuela. The democracy programs support civil society organizations and promote human rights. 

·         Included $60 million for the Nonprofits Security Grant Program. The program helps certain non-profits harden their facilities against attack, such as organization like the Jewish Community Centers (JCCs) in Orlando and Miami and elsewhere. Nelson requested this funding after JCCs across Florida received a series of telephone bomb threats. 

·         Increased funding for the Holocaust Survivor Assistance Program to $5 million. Nelson requested $5 million in funding to provide long-term support and services for Holocaust survivors. 

 

The spending package included several provisions Nelson co-sponsored to address gun violence in Florida and across the country, including: 

·         Fix NICS Act. Nelson cosponsored this bipartisan bill, which requires federal agencies and states to develop implementation plans to upload to the National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS) all information prohibiting a person from purchasing a firearm, rewards states who comply with these plans through federal grant preferences, and reauthorizes and improves programs that help states share information on criminal records with NICS, among other things. 

·         STOP School Violence Act. Nelson co-sponsored this bipartisan bill that would allow schools to access federal funds to invest in programs, training and technology to keep students safe. 

·         CDC Gun Violence Research. The spending package included language to clarify that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) can conduct research on gun violence.


FAMU President's Student Recruitment Tour Stops in Miami, Monday March 12

President's Tour 2018

Florida A&M University president Dr. Larry Robinson, the University’s performing troupe, the FAMU Connection, various FAMU staff and student leaders will make their Miami stop of the 2018 President’s Recruitment Tour at 6:30 p.m., Monday, March 12, 2018, at Miami Jackson Senior High School Auditorium, 1751 NW 36th Street, Miami, FL 33142.

All interested high school students and their parents are invited to attend. Attendees will have an opportunity to chat one-on-one with University academic representatives, student leaders and alumni. Scholarships will be awarded on the spot to graduating seniors contingent upon qualifying GPA and test scores. 

Interested students can apply online at www.famu.edu/admissions

 

 

 


Memorial Day: Remembering the first South Florida soldier killed by anti-US insurgents in Iraq - Sgt. Edmond L. "Dakie" Randle

Sgt. Edmond L. Randle
On Jan. 17, 2004, Sgt. Edmond L. Randle, Jr. of Miami Gardens became the first documented South Florida soldier to be killed by anti-US insurgents in Iraq.
Today is Memorial Day. It is the day we honor those that have given their lives in military service to this country. It is not just a day off from work or school or a day to have a barbecue with family and friends; it is a day to celebrate men and women such as Sgt. Edmond L. Randle, Jr., known by family and friends as Dakie.
 
On Jan. 17, 2004, Sgt. Edmond L. Randle, Jr. of Miami Gardens became the first documented South Florida soldier to be killed by anti-US insurgents in Iraq. Randle was one of three soldiers who died that day when their vehicle was struck by a homemade explosive device near Baghdad. I recall sitting through Dakie's funeral at Ebenezer Baptist Church, in Miami, listening to the FAMU Band play and the moving tributes to him by friends and military officials. I'd known Dakie's parents from high school; his dad and I were classmates at Miami Central and later at Florida A&M.
 
Dakie attended American Senior High for part of his high school years but continued the family tradition by graduating from Miami Central Senior High. Like his Dad, Dakie was a standout musician in the Marching Rockets at Miami Central and continued at Florida A&M University where he earned a music scholarship and was a section leader in the famous Marching 100. Because he wanted to be a pharmacist, Dakie gave up his music scholarship and volunteered for the Army which would help fund his educational plans. He was the type of young man not celebrated enough, in life, in this community.
 
The war in Iraq takes on a different meaning when you actually know a soldier that was killed. Like Sgt. Edmond L. “Dakie” Randle, many other lives have been lost and are being lost in service to this country. On Veteran's Day, I honor several men and women I know, living and deceased, who have served and are serving this country. Dakie, however, is the only soldier I know personally that died in military service. I have remembered him each Memorial Day since his death, that is the least I can do.
 
If you have loved ones who died while serving this country, take a moment to thank them, feel free to leave their names in the comments section. For all of our fallen heroes, known and unknown, thank you, you are not forgotten.
 

 

Va-va sig 75x39

 @vanessawbyers

 

#MemorialDay2016 #NeverForget

  


Bennett College hosts conference focused on brand management and sustainability of HBCUs

  Bennett College hosts conference

GREENSBORO, NC — The spring 2016 HBCUgrow LEAD Conference, on the campus of Bennett College, featured North Carolina Senator Gladys Robinson, who spoke about the many faces of Jim Crow and how HBCUs can thrive in the 2016 political landscape. “Jim Crow has many faces, not only police brutality but injustice at the levels that denies food stamps for the hungry, housing for the homeless and access to higher education for our young people,” said Robinson.  The senator also highlighted several ways that HBCUs can sustain their momentum.  She encouraged HBCU leaders to focus on fundraising, sustainable endowments and achieving strong alumni giving.  She ended her address by issuing a challenge to the audience. “I encourage you to remember how you felt when you got that baccalaureate degree from an HBCU, and then I want you to go out and lift your hands and voices so that students that attend HBCUs can feel the same way,” she said.

The conference was designed to provide HBCUs with best practices in attracting prospective students, talented faculty, and donors.  Also, the conference recognized excellence at HBCUs. The HBCUgrow  2016 Gold Award winners were:  Shaw University for LEAD website,” Florida A&M University for LEAD marketing and the President of Shaw University, Tashni-Ann Dubroy for the “Best Leadership.”

Bennett College President Rosalind Fuse-Hall delivered the keynote address for the luncheon dispelling the notion that higher education is no longer the key to opportunity. “Americans are being constantly told that we are weighing students down with excessive debt, they can’t graduate timely, and we don’t really need that many people that are well educated -- we just need a few people with a few certifications to do certain things.  We know that this is not the case,” said Fuse-Hall.”  She also discussed the importance of student enrollment, fiscal stability, fundraising, budgeting, leveraging facilities, and having a better understanding of the dynamics of governing boards.

HBCUgrow is a consortium dedicated to helping HBCUs grow enrollment and alumni giving, and tackle the changing landscape of marketing challenges. HBCUgrow helps by offering a community of like-minded professionals sharing knowledge and inspiring HBCUs to grow. The group organizes conferences and events on topics such as enrollment management, alumni engagement, and marketing. To learn more, visit www.hbcugrow.com or join the HBCUgrow group on LinkedIn.

College Presidents
College leaders attending the HBCUgrow LEAD Conference were (left to right): and President of Shaw University Tashni-Ann Dubroy; Bennett College President Rosalind Fuse-Hall; Dr. Debra Saunders-White, chancellor at North Carolina Central University; and Dr. Larry Czarda, president at Greensboro College.

 

Participants
From left to right are: Jeanne Frazer, president of Vitalink, one of the Founding Partners of HBCUgrow; Anthony Brooks, Vice President for Enrollment Management at Shaw University; N.C. Senator Gladys Robinson; Bennett College Senior Cymone Baker; David Hoard, president of DHT & Associates and an HBCUgrow Advisory Board member; Audrey Franklin, executive director of Alumnae Relations at Bennett College; and Dr. Kim Long, associate provost for Administration at Wiley College.

 


National Society of Black Engineers Receives $2 Million Grant from Northrop Grumman Foundation

 New Program Aims to Widen the Pipeline to Engineering Careers from HBCUs

NSBE
Chairman Neville receives the 2 million dollar check on stage from Northrop Grumman Corporate Vice President, Darryl M Fraser. (Image: Grant Martin)

 

ALEXANDRIA, Va. — The Northrop Grumman Foundation and the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE) have launched a three-year, $2-million program designed to expand the nation’s engineering workforce through a partnership with Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). The Northrop Grumman Corporation/NSBE Integrated Pipeline Program, funded by the Northrop Grumman Foundation, will provide 72 engineering students with $8,000 scholarship grants, internships with Northrop Grumman and year-round academic and professional development support. The program’s three HBCU partners — Florida A&M University, Howard University and North Carolina A&T State University — will receive grants, technical assistance and a package of programs researched and managed by NSBE, to increase their already high capacity to recruit, retain and graduate engineers. NSBE is one of the largest student-governed professional societies based in the United States.

Executives of the Northrop Grumman Foundation and Northrop Grumman Corporation presented the $2-million grant to NSBE’s National Executive Board on March 26, during NSBE’s 42nd Annual Convention in Boston, Mass. The presidents of the NSBE chapters at Florida A&M, Howard and North Carolina A&T also joined the presentation. The convention drew more than 11,000 attendees to address the theme “Engineering a Cultural Change.” NSBE’s more than 31,000 members are dedicated to the Society’s mission: “to increase the number of culturally responsible black engineers who excel academically, succeed professionally and positively impact the community.”

“Northrop Grumman and the Northrop Grumman Foundation are committed to helping improve science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education to ensure a future workforce that can protect our nation and maintain our global leadership,” said Sandra Evers-Manly, Northrop Grumman vice president, global corporate responsibility and president of the Northrop Grumman Foundation.  “Our partnership with NSBE will help us achieve that goal and develop the pipeline of diverse talent that is so important to our company and our society’s future.”

“Our sincere thanks to the Northrop Grumman Foundation for this generous investment in our mission,” said NSBE National Chair Neville Green. “The student leadership of NSBE is excited about this program’s potential to move us toward the goals of our strategic plan and support HBCUs in the process. Initiatives such as this, with strong strategic partners, will be critical, as we seek to increase the number of African-American bachelor’s degree recipients in engineering from 3,500 to 10,000 annually over the next nine years.”

“We are delighted to receive this endorsement of our work from one of America’s most innovative companies,” said NSBE Executive Director Karl W. Reid, Ed.D. “For years, we have spoken about the vital role that engineering diversity plays in our national economy and national security. Northrop Grumman’s investment in this program illustrates that they understand the need exists and are willing to do something about it. This fact is reflected not only in their longtime support of NSBE but also in the high ratings the company receives from our membership.”

The first cohort of 24 Northrop Grumman Corporation/NSBE scholars will be selected in December, and their participation in the Pipeline Program will be kicked off with a summit meeting in March 2017, during NSBE’s 43rd Annual Convention in Kansas City, Mo. Summer internships for the first cohort will begin in May 2017.


Sanders Campaign to Launch HBCU Tour at South Carolina State University

Berniesandershbcu

BURLINGTON, Vt - U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders' campaign on Thursday will kick-off the 'Feel the Bern' HBCU tour at South Carolina State University in collaboration with Benedict College. Planned stops for the HBCU tour include, Tennessee State University, Alabama State University, Jackson State University, Florida A&M University, Virginia State University, Howard University, the Atlanta University Center and Benedict College. The South Carolina State University stop will feature Dr. Cornel West who will discuss a wide range of issues, including making public colleges and universities tuition-free and criminal justice reform.

Here is the itinerary:

Thursday, January 14
7 p.m. HBCU Tour, 
South Carolina State University, Recital Hall, Barbara A. Vaughan Fine Arts Center, 300 College Street, Orangeburg, South Carolina

Information for the public: Doors open at 6:30 p.m. This event is free and open to the public, but RSVPs are strongly encouraged.
 

ALPHA KAPPA ALPHA MOURNS THE LOSS OF BUSINESS LEADER SYBIL COLLINS MOBLEY

Dr. Sybil C. Mobley
Dr. Sybil Collins Mobley, Founding Dean of the Florida A&M University School of Business & Industry

 

 

Chicago, Illinois  – Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated® mourns the loss of educator and business leader, Dr. Sybil Collins Mobley.

Under Mobley’s leadership, Florida A&M University created the renowned School of Business and Industry, based on a model of recruiting the brightest students and faculty, providing students with full scholarships and ensuring they completed three internships before graduation. A dedicated professor, role model, and iconic force, she was instrumental in preparing students for the global economy. Mobley served as dean for almost 30 years until her 2003 retirement.

Speaking on behalf of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority’s 283,000 members worldwide, the sorority’s International President Dorothy Buckhanan Wilson lauded Mobley as a "trailblazer and steadfast supporter of education. She was a gifted educator, business leader and a stalwart for excellence among her students throughout her long and distinguished career."

Mobley was initiated into the sorority in 1951 in the Delta Kappa Omega Chapter (Tallahassee, Florida). Mobley is survived by her three children, James Otis Mobley Jr., Janet Mobley Sermon and the Rev. Melvin Edward Mobley. She is also survived by 14 grandchildren and 14 great-grandchildren.


Are you ready for some HBCU football?

It's that time of year again and if it's HBCU football time then it's time for trash-talking and bragging rights. While the winner of the game is determined by the final score, the half-time competition between marching bands is a serious matter. Check out this video of one of Ricky Smiley's most hilarious comedy routines.

 

To help you get your travel plans in order, check out HBCU Buzz for the list of this year's Homecoming games. I'll save some of you the trouble, FAMU's Homecoming game is October 17 and BCU is October 24. Who are their opponents? It doesn't matter, it's Homecoming! 

Check out page 59 of the September 2015 issue of Ebony magazine for tips on attending your college's Homecoming. The print and digital versions of the magazine feature a picture of a Florida A&M University Marching 100 drummer. Get the HBCU Homecoming spirit!

Ebony Magazine September 2015
FAMU Drummer

 

 

 

 

 


FAMU New Student Send-Off, Sat. 8/8

 

11782520_10207178096552767_4068863221456570553_o

The Miami-Dade Chapter of the Florida A&M University National Alumni Association celebrates local 2015 incoming freshmen and chapter scholarship recipients.

New Jerusalem Primitive Baptist Church 777 NW 85th Street Miami, FL 33150

For more information call (740) 7GO-FAMU. RSVP: gofamu@miamidaderattlers.org