Lifestyle & Entertainment

African American Read-In at Miami Dade College Feb. 4

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Hey book lovers! The 2019 African American Read-In takes place at Miami Dade College’s North Campus tomorrow, February 4. The goal is to make literacy, education, and community a significant part of Black History Month.

This year’s African American Read-In presenter is Glory Edim author of Well-Read Black Girl: Finding Our Stories, Discovering Ourselves.

This event is open to high school and college students, as well as, local community members. RSVP here. 

 

If You go:

African American Read-In
Monday, February 4, 2019 @ 10:00 am
Miami Dade College North Campus
11380 NW 27th Ave, Miami, FL 33167 


Longest-running local community Kwanzaa Celebration continues at The ARC in Opa-locka [VIDEO]

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The Spirit of Kwanzaa lives in Miami-Dade County. On Saturday, December 29, 2018, it was demonstrated at The ARC (Arts & Recreation Center) in the beautiful City of Opa-locka, Florida. The 29th Annual Mary Williams Woodard Legacy Kwanzaa Celebration evolved into a true community event welcomed by various groups and entities beyond its local beginnings. 

More than 150 people were in attendance as the traditional procession of the Council of Community Elders was announced via drummer Jah Will B. Elders are not recognized because of age but due to their contributions to the community. Many are often unsung heroes. This year’s elders included Chief Nathaniel B. Styles Jr. who also served as event MC; HRH Iya Orite Adefunmi; School Board Member Dorothy Bendross Mindingall; Bernadette Cecelia Poitier; Rubye Howard; Thomasina Turner-Diggs; Eric Pettus; “Broadway” Cuthbert Harewood; James Wright; Amare and Amani Amari; Netcher Hopi Mose and Angela Berry.

Because of construction at the African Heritage Cultural Arts Center, where the event has been presented for many years, its consecutive presentation would have been interrupted were it not for Opa-locka Vice Mayor Chris Davis; Nakeisha Williams and the Opa-Locka CDC; and Nakia Bowling of Zoe’s Dolls. 

As is customary, the Nguzo Saba, Seven Principles of Kwanzaa and symbols of Kwanzaa were explained with the assistance of audience members and the Ivy Rosettes of Gamma Zeta Omega Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority who also served as hostesses. Tracey Jackson delivered the welcome on behalf of the Miami-Dade Chapter of the Florida A&M University National Alumni Association. Remembering those who have transitioned is an important aspect of Kwanzaa. Dr. Natasha C. Stubbs delivered a moving recognition of local and national individuals who became deceased since last year’s Kwanzaa event. Entertainment was provided by the Next Generation Dance Academy and poets Rebecca “Butterfly” Vaughns and realproperlike. New World School of the Arts junior, Nicholaus Gelin, serenaded attendees with his trumpet during the feast portion of the evening.

“We enjoyed the event,” said a mother who traveled from Coral Springs with her son and his best friend to attend the celebration. They said they will attend next year and the boys want to participate on the program. 

The Kwanzaa Celebration is hosted by the Miami-Dade Chapter of the FAMU Alumni Association, the Dr. Arthur and Mary Woodard Foundation for Education and Culture; and Osun’s Village African Caribbean Cultural Arts Corridor.

 



 

 

 

 

 


Everything you need to know about Kwanzaa through The Kwanzaa Song [VIDEO]

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This spoken word video presentation explains everything one needs to know about Kwanzaa --- how, when, why it was started and its purpose. If more Black people, regardless of place of birth, would practice Kwanzaa, it would shift the balance of socioeconomic power throughout the world and restore us to our traditional and rightful place of prominence. Listen. Learn. Share.

Written and performed by Clinton Sockwell II. Music - “Rubber Soul” by Herbie Hancock

 

 


Happy Kwanzaa! Day 7: Imani - Faith

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Greeting: Habari Gani?! (What's going on?)

Response: Imani! [ee-mah-nee]

 

Today is the seventh day of Kwanzaa. On this day we celebrate the principle of faith. According to the Nguzo Saba (seven principles), faith means: "To believe, with all our heart, in our Creator, our people, our parents, our teachers, our leaders, and the righteousness and victory of our struggle." 

We must have confidence in ourselves, in our leaders, teachers, parents and in the righteousness and victory of our struggle, faith that through hard work, we can regain our rightful place of prominence as a free, proud and productive people. 

Kwanzaa is a seven-day celebration for a year-long practice. Remember the Nguzo Saba all-year-long!

Harambee!

Harambee!

Harambee!

Harambee!

Harambee!

Harambee!

HARAMBEE!

 


Happy Kwanzaa! Day 6: Kuumba - Creativity

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Greeting: Habari Gani?! (What's going on?)

Response: Kuumba! [koo-oom-bah]

Today is the sixth day of Kwanzaa. On this day we celebrate the principle of creativity. According to the Nguzo Saba (seven principles), creativity means: “to do always as much as we can in the way that we can in order to leave our community more beautiful and beneficial than when we inherited it.” We are a creative people. 

Harambee!


Kwanzaa Day 5: Let's Celebrate Nia (Purpose)!

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Greeting: Habari gani!

Response: Nia!

 

Today is the fifth day of Kwanzaa, the principle we celebrate is purpose. “To make our collective vocation the building and developing of our community in order to restore our people to their traditional greatness.” 

This principle is about legacy. It clearly indicates that it is our responsibility, as a people group, to do what we must to build and develop our community to restore our people to their rightful place of prominence.

Pay attention. In communities throughout the United States, the legacy of the people of the African diaspora has been or is being destroyed. Let’s protect our communities. Let’s protect our legacy.

 

Harambee!

 


Day 3 of Kwanzaa: Ujima (Collective Work and Responsibility)

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Call: Habari Gani?! (What's going on?)

Response: Ujima! [oo-jee-muh]

 

Today is the third day of Kwanzaa. The principle celebrated is Ujima or collective work and responsibility. That means to build and maintain our community together and make our brother's and sister's problems our problems and to solve them together.

It is through togetherness that Africans in the diaspora as well as the motherland will not only survive but thrive. During segregation in America, close knit Black communities often formed the foundation for many businesses and other opportunities for success for individuals and the collective. Through this village concept Blacks made tremendous progress in spite of often living in an atmosphere of terror.

Harambee! Let’s work together.

 

“A man is called selfish not for pursuing his own good, but for neglecting his neighbor’s.” ~Richard Whately

 

Related Link: Celebrate Kwanzaa in Miami

 


The Second Day of Kwanzaa: Kujichagulia

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Greeting: Habari gani!

Response: Kujichagulia (KOO-GEE-CHA-GOO-LEE-AH)! 

Today is the second day of Kwanzaa. The principle we celebrate is Kujichagulia which means Self-Determination. To define ourselves, to name ourselves, speak for ourselves and create for ourselves.

Kujichagulia is a commitment to building our lives in our own images and interests. If we, as a people, are to achieve our goals we must take the responsibility for that achievement. Self-determination is the essence of freedom. This day calls for a reaffirmation of our commitment to work together for Black people everywhere, particularly here in America, to build more meaningful and fulfilling lives. 

Harambee!

 

Related Link:

Celebrate Kwanzaa in Miami


South Miami Alphas Partner with Miami-Dade NPHC to Spread Holiday Cheer in Florida City

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On Wednesday, December 19, 2018, the Iota Pi Lambda Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Incorporated joined the Miami-Dade National Pan-Hellenic Council to distribute Christmas gifts to the entire student body of Florida City Elementary School. The Miami-Dade National Pan-Hellenic Council hosts an annual toy collection drive to provide Christmas gifts to children who reside in low income communities.

The Council’s holiday gift market included books, action figures, balls, dolls, remote control vehicles, Legos and electronic learning devices for primary school age children. The students were allowed to select their personal gifts to take home. In total, over 400 toys were collected by NPHC local affiliate organizations (Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Omega Psi Phi Fraternity and Zeta Phi Beta Sorority) and distributed at the school site. A surplus of toys which included featured hot items - two bicycles and a drone - were allocated to the school administration to serve as achievement prizes to inspire and reward student performance during the remainder of the school year.


Christmas Greetings from Blogging Black Miami

Christmas Together by Mary Nagy

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I hung the decorations
and I trimmed the christmas tree.
What really means the most of all
is that you're here with me.

You make the season special
without spending lots of dough.
Your neverending friendship
means more than you could know.

I can't say what it means to me
to share this special time.
I thank God for another year
that He's let you be mine.

Let's deck the halls and celebrate
with family and friends.
But, lets take time for you and me
before the season ends.